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Week 6 Perspectives of Stakeholders: Teachers, Students, Parents, and Community.

Week 6 Perspectives of Stakeholders: Teachers, Students, Parents, and Community.

Week 6 Perspectives of Stakeholders: Teachers, Students, Parents, and Community.
Instructions: Read at least 1: and answer these questions as you are doing your paper. Think about your own relationship to school and education, and yourself as a stakeholder, as you complete this week’s readings.
• Who are the stakeholders for disability education, and what do we gain from each of their perspectives?
• While keeping disabled people always at the forefront, what can we learn from students, teachers, school community members, and family members as we envision a pathway forward?
• What unique experiences do disabled educators bring to the table?
Read at least 1:
Coughlin, A. B. (2018). Teaching on wheels: Bringing a disability experience into the classroom. In M. S. Jeffress (Ed.) International perspectives on teaching with disability: Overcoming obstacles and enriching lives. New York: Routledge.
Valle, J. (2016). Learning from and collaborating with families: The case for DSE in teacher education. In M. Cosier & C. Ashby (Eds.) Enacting change from within: Disability studies meets teaching and teacher education. New York: Peter Lang.
Wilkerson, A. L. (2016, December 14). Should I tell my students I have depression? The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/14/opinion/should-i-tell-my-students-i-have-depression.html.
Read and analyze the following article:
• Shapiro, E. & Harris, E. A. (2020, April 16). This is schooling now for 200,000 N.Y.C. children in special education. New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/16/nyregion/special-education-coronavirus-nyc.html.

• Who are the stakeholders for disability education, and what do we gain from each of their perspectives?
• While keeping disabled people always at the forefront, what can we learn from students, teachers, school community members, and family members as we envision a pathway forward?
• What unique experiences do disabled educators bring to the table?

Are you interested in the perspective of disabled educators? You might want to read Abby L. Wilkerson’s New York Times Disability essay “Should I Tell My Students I Have Depression?” Dr. April Coughlin, who has taught at CUNY before and did pioneering research on the experiences of students with mobility impairments in New York City public schools, reflects on her own experiences teaching middle, high school, college, and graduate students. Her chapter “Teaching On Wheels: Bringing a Disability Experience into the Classroom” is illuminating. What can you learn from disabled educators about how to make schools most accessible and inclusive?
Are you interested in what disability studies in education can do for teachers more generally? Alicia Broderick, D. Kim Reid, and Jan Valle wrote Chapter 10, “Disability Studies In Education and the Practical Concerns of Teachers,” and address this question through their research study and analysis. Meanwhile, in Chapter 13 in our anthology, “Developing Inclusive Practices Through Connections Between Home, Community, and School” Claire Tregaskis ties the theme back to inclusive education.
Are you interested in the dynamics between family members and school staff and faculty? Jan Valle’s book chapter “Learning from and Collaborating with Families: The Case for DSE in Teacher Education” provides a fascinating background with more of the history of the power dynamic between teachers/administrators and parents/guardians. In our anthology, Ferguson & Ferguson’s Chapter 14, “Finding the ‘Proper Attitude’: The Potential of Disability Studies to Reframe Family/School Linkages,” offers some practical advice on how to use disability studies in education to strengthen the connections between schools and families of students with disabilities. What can you learn about the history and present of power dynamics between family members and school staff? Which ideas stuck out to you positively or negatively for improving these dynamics?